Port Of Hamburg Completes Tour Of The United States

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"Hamburg has the facilities — and the drive — to develop into the most important North Sea/Baltic port for handling United States cargoes," according to Helmut F.H. Hansen, executive director of port commerce, Port of Hamburg.

That was the message he delivered during a recent three-week visit to Washington, Boston, New York, and Norfolk. In each city, Mr. Hansen and his party met with a variety of industry members in order to familiarize them with the services offered by the port. Last year, the Port of Hamburg handled approximately 10 million tons of U.S.-originating cargo. Shipments consisted primarily of coal, grain and general cargo, with coal eyed as the growth commodity for 1981. According to Mr. Hansen, the port handled about 2.5 million tons of U.S. coal last year and has the capability to "easily" transship five to six million tons annually.

Noting what he termed "coal fever" in several U.S. ports, he predicted the European market would continue to view U.S. coal as an attractive alternative to OPEC oil.

At luncheons and dinner receptions in each city, Mr. Hansen, accompanied by his wife, Carla, and Michael Kutney, North American marketing manager for the Port of Hamburg, met with officials f r om trade, commerce, shipping, U.S. ports and governments. The advantages and superior transshipment facilities offered by the port were detailed, and efforts were made to establish commercial partnership with U.S. ports.

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